White supremacists and their sympathizers often used crime data to justify the harming and mistreatment of Blacks.


One of the favorite claims made by people promoting anti Black propaganda using crime data, is the claim that Blacks are only 13% of the American population, but are responsible for 52% of the murders in America. They also make the below:


Blacks are only 13% of the American population, but are responsible for 52% of the violent crimes in America.


Blacks men are only 6% of the American population, but are responsible for 52% of the murders in America.


Blacks are only 13% of the American population, but are over represented in every single crime data statistic.


Blacks are only 13% of the American population, but are accounted for most of the arrests in America.


EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THE CLIAMS ABOVE IS A LIE

Most of the people making these false claims often misrepresent what Table 21 of the FBI’s 2016 crime data is saying. I will use this page on my website to educate all of you on the truth regarding what the FBI crime data says, while debunking all the false claims and propaganda used to demonize Blacks in America.


Who is responsible for collecting crime data?

The Nation’s Two Crime Measures

The U.S. Department of Justice administers two statistical programs to measure the magnitude, nature, and impact of crime in the Nation: the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program and the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). Each of these programs produces valuable information about aspects of the Nation’s crime problem. Because the UCR and NCVS programs are conducted for different purposes, use different methods, and focus on somewhat different aspects of crime, the information they produce together provides a more comprehensive panorama of the Nation’s crime problem than either could produce alone.

Uniform Crime Reports

The UCR Program, administered by the FBI, began in 1929 and collects information on the following crimes reported to law enforcement authorities: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Law enforcement agencies report arrest data for 21 additional crime categories.

The UCR Program compiles data from monthly law enforcement reports or individual crime incident records transmitted directly to the FBI or to centralized state agencies that then report to the FBI. The Program thoroughly examines each report it receives for reasonableness, accuracy, and deviations that may indicate errors. Large variations in crime levels may indicate modified records procedures, incomplete reporting, or changes in a jurisdiction’s boundaries. To identify any unusual fluctuations in an agency’s crime counts, the Program compares monthly reports to previous submissions of the agency and with those for similar agencies.

The UCR Program presents crime counts for the Nation as a whole, as well as for regions, states, counties, cities, towns, tribal law enforcement, and colleges and universities. This permits studies among neighboring jurisdictions and among those with similar populations and other common characteristics.

The FBI annually publishes its findings in a preliminary release in the spring of the following calendar year, followed by a detailed annual report, Crime in the United States, issued in the fall. In addition to crime counts and trends, this report includes data on crimes cleared, persons arrested (age, sex, and race), law enforcement personnel, and the characteristics of homicides (including age, sex, and race of victims and offenders; victim-offender relationships; weapons used; and circumstances surrounding the homicides). Other periodic reports are also available from the UCR Program.

The state and local law enforcement agencies participating in the UCR Program are continually converting to the more comprehensive and detailed National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS). The NIBRS provides detailed information about each criminal incident in 22 broad categories of offenses.


Each program has unique strengths. The UCR provides a measure of the number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies throughout the country. The UCR’s Supplementary Homicide Reports provide the most reliable, timely data on the extent and nature of homicides in the Nation. The NCVS is the primary source of information on the characteristics of criminal victimization and on the number and types of crimes not reported to law enforcement authorities.

THE FBI WEBSITES WARNS OF THE FOLLOWING

Caution against ranking: Each year when Crime in the United States is published, some entities use the figures to compile rankings of cities and counties. These rough rankings provide no insight into the numerous variables that mold crime in a particular town, city, county, state, tribal area, or region. Consequently, they lead to simplistic and/or incomplete analyses that often create misleading perceptions adversely affecting communities and their residents. Valid assessments are possible only with careful study and analysis of the range of unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction. The data user is, therefore, cautioned against comparing crime data of individual reporting units from cities, metropolitan areas, states, or colleges or universities solely on the basis of their population coverage or student enrollment.

The flawed use of using "so called per capita analysis" regarding population, with the FBI crime data report, is rapid among White supremacist and their sympathizers
https://www.fbi.gov/news/pressrel/press-releases/fbi-releases-2016-crime-statistics … and the FBI warns us of this

Smaller towns and cities with a population of 10,000 or below are not required to send in crime data to the FBI - City law enforcement agencies with a population of 10,000 and over in population and county law enforcement agencies 25,000 and over in population, are mostly on this site.


Source: https://www.ucrdatatool.gov/faq.cfm

(The FBI Crime data does not include and document crimes committed, in a lot of the smaller White communities, across the United States)


The FBI’s website explains how one should Make valid assessments of crime and White supremacists and their sympathizers never follow this assessment.

It is incumbent upon all data users to become as well educated as possible about how to understand and quantify the nature and extent of crime in the United States and in any of the more than 17,000 jurisdictions represented by law enforcement contributors to the UCR Program. Valid assessments are possible only with careful study and analysis of the various unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction.

Historically, the causes and origins of crime have been the subjects of investigation by many disciplines. Some factors that are known to affect the volume and type of crime occurring from place to place are:

Population density and degree of urbanization.


Variations in composition of the population, particularly youth concentration.


Stability of the population with respect to residents’ mobility, commuting patterns, and transient factors.


Modes of transportation and highway system.


Economic conditions, including median income, poverty level, and job availability.


Cultural factors and educational, recreational, and religious characteristics.


Family conditions with respect to divorce and family cohesiveness.


Climate.


Effective strength of law enforcement agencies.


Administrative and investigative emphases of law enforcement.


Policies of other components of the criminal justice system (i.e., prosecutorial, judicial, correctional, and probational).


Citizens’ attitudes toward crime.


Crime reporting practices of the citizenry.


The UCR Program provides a nationwide view of crime based on statistics contributed by local, county, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies. Population size is the only correlate of crime presented in this publication. Although many of the listed factors equally affect the crime of a particular area, the UCR Program makes no attempt to relate them to the data presented.


The data user is, therefore, cautioned against comparing statistical data of individual reporting units from cities, counties, metropolitan areas, states, or colleges or universities solely on the basis on their population coverage or student enrollment.


Until data users examine all the variables that affect crime in a town, city, county, state, region, or other jurisdiction, they can make no meaningful comparisons.


source: https://www.ucrdatatool.gov/ranking.cfm